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Every castle needs a team to keep it running. We’re no exception. With so many adventures to plan, heroes to teach, and questions to answer, things can get a bit hectic within these castle walls. But with the right staff we manage to maintain order and keep the fun flowing!

When you give us a call you’re greeted by a warm, friendly, and enthusiastic voice (or someone talking about goblins if you get the answering machine). We’d like to introduce you to the faces behind the phone, our two most recent additions to the Guard Up crew. Please wave hello Katie and Des…

 

Katie | Commander of the Desk

Hi! My name is Katie, the new Customer Service & Sales Rep, or “storycollector” in simpler terms. I joined the team in July and have soaked up every bit of what Guardian Adventures offers that I can. My day includes keeping the office organized, answering your phone calls, playing ACE games with my coworkers, and daydreaming of attending D&D Night here to finally resurrect my character Kayd, the half-cat ranger.

When not at the desk you’ll find me hiking with my cat, practicing for roller derby (derby name suggestions are welcome), or playing Borderlands 2, my new obsession. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting lots of you already, and look forward to meeting many more!

Des | Coordinator of Adventure

Greetings! My name is Des and I hail from Wiscasset, Maine. Being a coastal girl, I am well-versed in all things ocean, and was the Educational Assistant for the Maine State Aquarium. Wondering how a lobster or shark can be beneficial to your quest? I’m your girl with the answer! I’m proud and excited to be a part of the Guard Up crew, with my fourth week starting today, and look forward to preparing our epic events and birthday adventures. If you see me in my office at The Castle be sure to pop in and say hello!

When I’m not there, I can be found cosplaying, embracing my many quirks, watching anime, or being a servant to my cat Hermione.

So there you have it folks. Welcoming faces all around! The next time you’ve got a Guardian on the phone you’ll know a bit more about their story, as we do our best to learn yours as well. Congratulations to Katie and Des on beginning a grand adventure with us…and with you.


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Outdoor camp has come to a climactic close and we simply cannot thank enough everyone who made it possible. From parents to counselors to the heroes themselves THANK YOU for another incredible summer of adventure.
Let’s take a look back at what your heroes got up to this year at Salem State…

WIZARDS & WARRIORS STEM SUMMER CAMP

Our heroes passed through The Gate Of Destiny and entered the magical realm of Sidleterra. They chose their respective Houses, got some combat training, and began their adventure with smiles and swords held high. Along the way, they studied the natural world around them, embarked on an archeological dig in an ancient burial ground, solved riddles and puzzles galore, and strengthened their understanding of the 3 Tenets of a Hero: Courage, Honor, and Compassion.
Creatures and characters littered their path as the adventure continued. The heroes met King Gilgamesh, a complex character, and fought alongside him in the shifting caverns. They gathered other magical allies and rid the land of the evil witch Baba Yaga. A cultural educator from the Center for Arabic Culture, Alma Richeh, arrived to teach the heroes about language and music.
In the final days of camp, the tablet of The Patrons went missing so our heroes traveled to a dark corner of Sidleterra where The Gate Of Destiny was originally crafted. They gathered information, banded together under a newly designed constitution, and defeated Tiamat’s giant army of evil. They also made boats…

I’ve literally made the best friends ever at Guard Up and they really taught, and are still teaching me, a lot about friendship and what it means to be a hero,” – Annika (Hero)
(Guard Up) is a place that allows children to have this amazing creativity in a space where they can be themselves,” – Lisa (Parent)

ZOMBIE STEM SUMMER CAMP

The Defenders entered the world of Asimov’s Foundation series, complete with the Galactic Empire, the Foundation resistance, and our big bad boss The Mule, a psychic mutant with control over the zombie hordes. They learned about the biology of the human brain while saving the helpful robot Daneel and vanquished The Mule by outsmarting his living dead henchmen.
The next week we introduced elements from Minority Report, specifically the concept of Pre-Crime. After learning about the concept, the campers decided that is was unethical to use it for themselves. They traversed a treacherous maze by solving parabolic equations, learned about punnet squares, and got to witness Marrow, the leader of the zombies, have a nice sloppy brain for lunch in the cafeteria (this was not served by our cooks, he brought it from home, we promise).

The environment here is really nice. You get to learn all the things that you would in school but in a fun and different way that’s very compelling,” – Panda (Monster Camper)
My son has been part of Guard Up for many many years and he loves the creativity, he loves working with the other kids, he loves being able to play different monsters, and I’m pretty sure he leaves a part of himself in Sidleterra every year,” – Liz (Parent)


Is your hero still itching for more summer camp excitement? We can help. King’s Watch Day Camp in Burlington is SOLD OUT next week but the final week (8/26 – 8/30) still has a few slots left. Register today and add one more week of adventure to your hero’s summer at www.guardup.com/campreg or give us a call at (781) 270-4800.
We’re looking forward to the next adventures on the horizon with great anticipation. Our storytellers have recently begun creating new interactive stories with a Moroccan cultural consultant, keeping with our standard of cultural respect and accuracy within our stories. Curious what this new tale will involve? Join your friendly local Guardians and find out for yourself…
…but before we dive into that, we’re thrilled to announce our big plans for October! (Hint: it’s got to do with Korea)

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As the sun sets on summer, we’re beginning preparations to close The Castle doors, raise the drawbridge, and get to work during Shutdown Week. The week runs from September 1st through the 7th, during which time we will not be running any classes or events. Instead, the week is a time for reflection, reinvention, and redesign (as well as a whole lot of cleaning). New things are just around the corner and we can’t wait to show you. But before we do, there’s plenty of work to be done. Take a peek at what’s on the horizon…

BRAND NEW ADVENTURES

The end of the summer season is also the beginning of a new cycle for our curriculum team. We’re sitting down to review all of our adventures, camps, courses, classes, the whole nine yards. Incorporating the ideas of some new teammates as well as the feedback from our members and parent-partners, the upcoming year is bound to be the very best yet!

FACILITY MAINTANANCE (the fun stuff)

Adventures can get messy. One of the biggest tasks of our annual Shutdown Week is rolling up our tunic sleeves and making The Castle shine. From the floors to the ceilings and everything in between, we work hard to make our play space spotless for your young heroes. When Shutdown Week comes to a close you’re all invited to come and see a newly renovated area, designed to welcome you into adventure the best way we can.

OUR NEW NAME

Guard Up is turning a whopping twenty years old in no time at all. To celebrate this milestone, we’re doing a bit of rebranding. Well, actually, quite a lot of rebranding! Before you know it Guard Up will transform into Guardian Adventures, boasting a redesigned logo, a greater focus on our educational themes, and partnerships with some big names to bring our adventures all over the world, by land and sea. Soon Guardian Adventures will be sharing our love of informal learning with audiences in every nook of the globe, but don’t worry…we’re still the same Guardians at The Castle ready to greet your young heroes with a smile and foam sword.
Not to mention, our birthday party coming up in the form of our annual Member Appreciation Spar-B-Q.

OUR NEW WEBSITE

As you may have read in our previous UpDate, the rebranding of Guard Up into Guardian Adventures will also pave the way for our brand new website! Twenty years of storytelling has resulted in more stories to share than we ever could have imagined and it’s time to tell the tales the right way. The new website will allow for more of these incredible adventures to be seen, while giving us the vehicle we need to promote our one of a kind strategies on STEM Education and informal learning. Our hope is that the news, videos, and articles we display will be invaluable assets to educators all around the world, increasing the quality of informal education for children everywhere. We can’t wait to show you what we’ve got cooking and see your face when the first page loads to your screen…
From all of us here at Guard Up (or Guardian Adventures if you’re reading this in the future), we would like to extend our thanks to everyone for another amazingly magical year. Cheers to what’s to come! We can’t wait to show you.

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I attended a weeklong conference for educators last year at Harvard Graduate School of Education. One of the speakers asked the audience what kinds of things they had learned that were not from formal classes or schooling. The audience offered a wide variety of topics from investing to woodworking. I briefly considered mentioning my own hobby of fire breathing… but didn’t want to throw the topic off with people wanting to know why the heck I would take up such an activity.

The instructor asked where each person learned their craft. For quite a few, the answer was YouTube. Some learned from friends. And of course, many read books or visited websites. In my case, I hired a professional circus performer because I knew the consequences of a mistake in lighting a big breath of liquid paraffin into a massive burst of flames just inches in front of my face could be quite painful, if not fatal. But the most interesting part about this discussion was the idea that, more than anything else, Informal Education teaches us our learning doesn’t stop when school ends.

Long ago, I read a book called Teaching as a Subversive Activity (Neil Postman & Charles Wingartner). I thought that schools needed a solid dose of this concept. However, not in the common interpretation of “let the kids learn whatever they want to learn” as much as making learning applicable to something of interest to the student. As well, I appreciated the chapter that bestowed upon the teachers the daunting task of helping students develop a strong “BS Detector”. This idea has never been more important than now in the Age of (Mis) Information.

Formal schooling serves a very important function in providing a foundation upon which to build our own inquiries. You will have a hard time getting the information you need to pursue your interest if you do not know how to read and write. You won’t be able to make sufficient estimates or question internet memes that contain questionable statistics if you don’t know math. History, myth, and literature teach us about humanity through time… what we did, why we did it, and whether the climate is becoming ripe for us to repeat atrocities we thought would never come to bear again.

Children need education. And yes, they do need at least some memorization. But as the foundation is being laid, they also need something very different: They need to be encouraged to tackle problems with no clear answer. Even better: Diving into problems that no one immediately knows how to approach with certainty. This is because at the highest level of innovation they will constantly find themselves in the state of “no one has done this before”.

My youngest daughter, Gwen, is working as a Physicist for the summer at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. They have shut down the Large Hadron Collider and a large team of Particle Physicists are working on a massive upgrade. Gwen is an undergrad at Cornell University and was accepted into a small program to spend the spring semester of her junior year at CERN. This internship was then extended into the summer as she continued her research work. Gwen is the one undergrad on her entire team who are almost entirely PhDs. She was given an assignment to program custom circuit boards for the CMS detector. The upgrade she is working on will go into effect in 7 years. 

When Gwen was handed the assignment, she was told that no one knew how to do what she was being asked to do. She would have to figure it out and then report back to the team. They could provide feedback and suggestions… but she was going to have to forge her own path. Meanwhile, the other team members were doing the same with their own assignments. This is because what they are trying to accomplish at CERN has never been done before on any machine, let alone the largest and most complex machine ever created by mankind.

When I talked to Gwen about this, she said that it was a little intimidating at first. Because as a student in school or college, you know you have a teacher, with answers, whom you can turn to if you are truly stumped. In this endeavor, however, everyone is in a constant state of trying to “figure it out”. Since there have been many people in the past who have used coding to accomplish goals that can be related to her project, Gwen spends quite a bit of time reading and researching what others have done.  Then, building off of these resources, she combines approaches and tries different paths… essentially just “messing around” with the coding to try and see what fits her objective. She also mentioned that one hurdle she had to overcome was letting go of achieving specific outcomes in a specific time frame – which is what a lot of formal education focuses on. Instead, there are checkpoints where the teams meet and individuals give presentations on their work. The focus is more on showing progress than on having concrete expectations around what is being produced.

I recall one scientist saying that most discoveries come less from having the right answers as much as having the right questions. But having the right questions is often not the focus of formal primary and secondary education (although it tends to get into much more exploration at the college level). Innovation requires us to learn a process of forming an inquiry. We need to let go of the idea that inquiry is innate. We may all be capable of asking questions. But if we lack foundational knowledge, we can waste a great deal of time asking questions that don’t address the challenge.

I don’t think the answer to raising innovative students is to abandon formal education. We do need foundational knowledge in order to build our inquiry. However, I think the strength of Informal Education makes more space for learning the process of inquiry. The process of Informal Learning is self-directed, learner-controlled, and present in most of our lives on a regular basis. It’s part of a child’s daily life when they play, such as building structures out of sticks or containers. As adults, we still come upon this in our own life routinely. Just think of the last time you looked up a solution to a problem you had on the internet.

There are many aspects of Informal Education and Learning that deserve comprehensive discussion and exploration. For example, Formal Education uses the “Push” model of education delivery: Teachers present information that the student receives. Informal Education uses the “Pull” model:  Students reach out and locate the information they need to solve the problem at hand. The former is assigned work that is often based in a grade (pass/fail). The latter is utilized by individuals who have an immediate need or interest that is based in performance (how well does it get the job done), to satisfy a curiosity, or for formulate an informed opinion. I see this repeatedly with digital natives (the generations who have grown up with the internet). If they want to know what kind of plant is in front of them, they can take a picture with their cell phone, upload it to the app called Seek, and it displays the name, genus, species, and other important information about the plant.

One of the biggest differences between Informal Learning and Formal Learning, however, is that the learning is driven by the learner and based on the learner’s desired outcome. Because of this, a higher level of motivation is often a driving factor in the learning process. It is easier to stay focused, work long hours, and be resilient when the learner has ownership over both the process and the outcome. Don’t believe me? Just watch a videogamer learning a new game. They will ignore sleep and food as they become immersed in the process.

Another important aspect of Informal Education is that failure isn’t just allowable, it’s necessary. Failure is an equivalent building block to success. Knowing what doesn’t work is just as important as knowing what works… and why. Ask anyone involved in innovation and they will tell you a long history of failures that led to the resulting service, product, or discovery. Failure is part of the process – not a punishable offense.

The challenge before us is that Informal Education has to meet the needs of the Informal Learner. With the power of the internet and massive databases of information, the focus can be more about curating information than creating it. However, then we need to figure out how to best present the information in a way that the learner can find it most readily, which is essentially the largest task of most modern search engines. There also has to be a consideration for which medium the information is relayed through – written instructions, video, online mentoring, story-telling, augmented reality? The method is often determined by the learner’s problem: 

  • How urgently is the solution needed?
  • What are the consequences if the provided answer is wrong?
  • What is my preferred learning style?
  • What is my current knowledge base or need for additional context?

There are many more questions that we need to answer. But thankfully, the topic is also the answer. So let’s move forward with the understanding that education doesn’t stop at the school exit. 

Let’s explore how and why people learn – both intentionally and incidentally. Presenting information in a manner that is both discoverable and applicable will be our biggest challenge as we collect more and more answers that are stepping stones to problems we have not yet identified. Through this process, along with collaboration and non-stop inquiry, we can inspire the innovation that is necessary for solving the most significant challenges before us… whether that’s how to breathe fire, or how to upgrade a particle accelerator.

About the Author:

Meghan Gardner is the founder of Guard Up, Inc. which owns and operates Wizards & Warriors and Zombie Summer Camps, programs and events. These educational camps and events are the STEM and story-based experience we all wanted to attend as a kid – where instead of watching movies or playing video games about heroes, mythological creatures, mystery, and adventure, they get to live it. Kids and teens spend the summer playing a character of their own design and fighting monsters with foam swords or NERF Blasters, physics, biology, chemistry, and more.


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Meghan Gardner in Korea 2019

This summer, I was once again honored to visit Seoul, South Korea as a lead trainer for the STEM Initiative, an educational alliance between ST Unitas (the parent company of The Princeton Review), professors from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and Guardian Adventures.

The trip was filled with training, meetings, visiting local destinations, and a banquet of learning for all of us.  As well as meeting our team of 20 teachers and over 100 students, I had the opportunity to interview one of the top executives of ST Unitas who was present at the company’s start: Vision Director Kahee Kim.

My interview with Ms. Kim was eye-opening to me on the cultural differences between Asia and the USA as it pertains to education, business, and even how certain words like “innovation” are defined.  If you are interested in knowing more, join me in the LinkedIn group about Informal Education & Learning.  I will be posting articles there about various interviews I conduct with individuals from around the world as we explore what Informal Learning and Education is and why it’s important.

Each day, Dr. Uche Amaechi and I would be picked up and brought to Seoul National University.  Found in 1946, SNU is considered the most prestigious university in the country (with an international tuition of $5,500 a year – no, that’s not a typo).  We trained the teachers in the curriculum based on the story that all of the students are Mars colonists and trying to survive on Mars while also trying to expand beyond the solar system.

On the last day in Seoul, just as we were leaving for the airport, our hosts asked us to chat with the students who had just arrived for the start of the first session of camp.  Disregarding the fact that both Uche and I were in our informal travel clothes in preparation for a 14 hour plane trip, we agreed to meet with the kids and cheered them on as they stepped into the educational adventure we helped create.  During the meet & greet, we had the opportunity to talk up our Winter Camp where kids from Korea visit the US to attend classes at Harvard and then an immersive adventure at Guardian Adventures.

Outside of working with the generous and diligent students, teachers, and business executives at the STEM Initiative, I was also provided with exquisite culinary experiences, jaw-dropping walks through Seoul’s largest Buddhism temple, and endearing conversations with a number of people about their day-to-day lives and Korean culture.

If you haven’t been to Seoul and have the opportunity, I highly recommend it.  It is a very modern city with gorgeous architecture that looks as if it were designed either 100 years into the future or 500 years into the past.  It’s immensely clean (the subway station especially) and safe.  Many of the residents speak English and are excited about sharing their beautiful city with foreigners.

I came home to discover that Guardian Adventures has been contracted by another international organization to develop educational programs for their clients.  We will share more about this project after the news goes public in November.  But we are very excited to see our company expanding into the global market and helping students of all ages all over the world learn through our educational adventures.  Stay tuned and let’s make this journey together.

 

 


About the Author:


Meghan Gardner is the founder of Guard Up, Inc. which owns and operates Wizards & Warriors and Zombie Summer Camps, programs and events. These educational camps and events are STEM and story-based experience where instead of watching movies or playing video games about heroes, mythological creatures, mystery, and adventure, the campers get to live it. Kids and teens spend the summer playing a character of their own design and fighting monsters with foam swords or NERF Blasters, physics, biology, chemistry, and more. Gardner is also a STEM Curriculum Designer for ST Unitas (the parent company of The Princeton Review), a guest lecturer at Harvard Graduate School of Education and other major universities, and an international speaker on the topic of Informal Education and Learning for all ages.



I attended a weeklong conference for educators last year at Harvard Graduate School of Education. One of the speakers asked the audience what kinds of things they had learned that were not from formal classes or schooling. The audience offered a wide variety of topics from investing to woodworking. I briefly considered mentioning my own hobby of fire breathing… but didn’t want to throw the topic off with people wanting to know why the heck I would take up such an activity.

The instructor asked where each person learned their craft. For quite a few, the answer was YouTube. Some learned from friends. And of course, many read books or visited websites. In my case, I hired a professional circus performer because I knew the consequences of a mistake in lighting a big breath of liquid paraffin into a massive burst of flames just inches in front of my face could be quite painful, if not fatal. But the most interesting part about this discussion was the idea that, more than anything else, Informal Education teaches us our learning doesn’t stop when school ends.

Long ago, I read a book called Teaching as a Subversive Activity (Neil Postman & Charles Wingartner). I thought that schools needed a solid dose of this concept. However, not in the common interpretation of “let the kids learn whatever they want to learn” as much as making learning applicable to something of interest to the student. As well, I appreciated the chapter that bestowed upon the teachers the daunting task of helping students develop a strong “BS Detector”. This idea has never been more important than now in the Age of (Mis) Information.

Formal schooling serves a very important function in providing a foundation upon which to build our own inquiries. You will have a hard time getting the information you need to pursue your interest if you do not know how to read and write. You won’t be able to make sufficient estimates or question internet memes that contain questionable statistics if you don’t know math. History, myth, and literature teach us about humanity through time… what we did, why we did it, and whether the climate is becoming ripe for us to repeat atrocities we thought would never come to bear again.

Children need education. And yes, they do need at least some memorization. But as the foundation is being laid, they also need something very different: They need to be encouraged to tackle problems with no clear answer. Even better: Diving into problems that no one immediately knows how to approach with certainty. This is because at the highest level of innovation they will constantly find themselves in the state of “no one has done this before”.

My youngest daughter, Gwen, is working as a Physicist for the summer at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. They have shut down the Large Hadron Collider and a large team of Particle Physicists are working on a massive upgrade. Gwen is an undergrad at Cornell University and was accepted into a small program to spend the spring semester of her junior year at CERN. This internship was then extended into the summer as she continued her research work. Gwen is the one undergrad on her entire team who are almost entirely PhDs. She was given an assignment to program custom circuit boards for the CMS detector. The upgrade she is working on will go into effect in 7 years. 

When Gwen was handed the assignment, she was told that no one knew how to do what she was being asked to do. She would have to figure it out and then report back to the team. They could provide feedback and suggestions… but she was going to have to forge her own path. Meanwhile, the other team members were doing the same with their own assignments. This is because what they are trying to accomplish at CERN has never been done before on any machine, let alone the largest and most complex machine ever created by mankind.

When I talked to Gwen about this, she said that it was a little intimidating at first. Because as a student in school or college, you know you have a teacher, with answers, whom you can turn to if you are truly stumped. In this endeavor, however, everyone is in a constant state of trying to “figure it out”. Since there have been many people in the past who have used coding to accomplish goals that can be related to her project, Gwen spends quite a bit of time reading and researching what others have done.  Then, building off of these resources, she combines approaches and tries different paths… essentially just “messing around” with the coding to try and see what fits her objective. She also mentioned that one hurdle she had to overcome was letting go of achieving specific outcomes in a specific time frame – which is what a lot of formal education focuses on. Instead, there are checkpoints where the teams meet and individuals give presentations on their work. The focus is more on showing progress than on having concrete expectations around what is being produced.

I recall one scientist saying that most discoveries come less from having the right answers as much as having the right questions. But having the right questions is often not the focus of formal primary and secondary education (although it tends to get into much more exploration at the college level). Innovation requires us to learn a process of forming an inquiry. We need to let go of the idea that inquiry is innate. We may all be capable of asking questions. But if we lack foundational knowledge, we can waste a great deal of time asking questions that don’t address the challenge.

I don’t think the answer to raising innovative students is to abandon formal education. We do need foundational knowledge in order to build our inquiry. However, I think the strength of Informal Education makes more space for learning the process of inquiry. The process of Informal Learning is self-directed, learner-controlled, and present in most of our lives on a regular basis. It’s part of a child’s daily life when they play, such as building structures out of sticks or containers. As adults, we still come upon this in our own life routinely. Just think of the last time you looked up a solution to a problem you had on the internet.

There are many aspects of Informal Education and Learning that deserve comprehensive discussion and exploration. For example, Formal Education uses the “Push” model of education delivery: Teachers present information that the student receives. Informal Education uses the “Pull” model:  Students reach out and locate the information they need to solve the problem at hand. The former is assigned work that is often based in a grade (pass/fail). The latter is utilized by individuals who have an immediate need or interest that is based in performance (how well does it get the job done), to satisfy a curiosity, or for formulate an informed opinion. I see this repeatedly with digital natives (the generations who have grown up with the internet). If they want to know what kind of plant is in front of them, they can take a picture with their cell phone, upload it to the app called Seek, and it displays the name, genus, species, and other important information about the plant.

One of the biggest differences between Informal Learning and Formal Learning, however, is that the learning is driven by the learner and based on the learner’s desired outcome. Because of this, a higher level of motivation is often a driving factor in the learning process. It is easier to stay focused, work long hours, and be resilient when the learner has ownership over both the process and the outcome. Don’t believe me? Just watch a videogamer learning a new game. They will ignore sleep and food as they become immersed in the process.

Another important aspect of Informal Education is that failure isn’t just allowable, it’s necessary. Failure is an equivalent building block to success. Knowing what doesn’t work is just as important as knowing what works… and why. Ask anyone involved in innovation and they will tell you a long history of failures that led to the resulting service, product, or discovery. Failure is part of the process – not a punishable offense.

The challenge before us is that Informal Education has to meet the needs of the Informal Learner. With the power of the internet and massive databases of information, the focus can be more about curating information than creating it. However, then we need to figure out how to best present the information in a way that the learner can find it most readily, which is essentially the largest task of most modern search engines. There also has to be a consideration for which medium the information is relayed through – written instructions, video, online mentoring, story-telling, augmented reality? The method is often determined by the learner’s problem: 

  • How urgently is the solution needed?
  • What are the consequences if the provided answer is wrong?
  • What is my preferred learning style?
  • What is my current knowledge base or need for additional context?

There are many more questions that we need to answer. But thankfully, the topic is also the answer. So let’s move forward with the understanding that education doesn’t stop at the school exit. 

Let’s explore how and why people learn – both intentionally and incidentally. Presenting information in a manner that is both discoverable and applicable will be our biggest challenge as we collect more and more answers that are stepping stones to problems we have not yet identified. Through this process, along with collaboration and non-stop inquiry, we can inspire the innovation that is necessary for solving the most significant challenges before us… whether that’s how to breathe fire, or how to upgrade a particle accelerator. 

 

 

About the Author: Meghan Gardner is the founder of Guard Up, Inc. which owns and operates Wizards & Warriors and Zombie Summer Camps, programs and events. These educational camps and events are the STEM and story-based experience we all wanted to attend as a kid – where instead of watching movies or playing video games about heroes, mythological creatures, mystery, and adventure, they get to live it. Kids and teens spend the summer playing a character of their own design and fighting monsters with foam swords or NERF Blasters, physics, biology, chemistry, and more.


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